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Lehigh Valley Company Develops Thermographic Monitoring System In Response to COVID-19

By Colin McEvoy on July 29, 2020

The Wilson borough-based software integrator company Pulse Innovations has developed a new Thermographic Monitoring System product. (image courtesy Pulse Innovations)

The Wilson borough-based software integrator company Pulse Innovations has developed a new Thermographic Monitoring System product. (image courtesy Pulse Innovations)

As the nation grapples with quarantines and millions of employees are telecommuting during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Lehigh Valley has a high percentage of essential jobs that cannot be done from home. Each week, we’re recognizing some of our Economic Heroes, the companies and organizations that are continuing to work during these difficult times, helping keep the regional economy strong and doing their part to help fight against the coronavirus.

Shortly after forming in Wilson borough last year, the technology company Pulse Innovations began to gain momentum, creating several radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology solutions and generating interest from a wide range of customers.

As with so many other companies, the coronavirus pandemic changed everything, reducing the demand for their usual projects. In response, Pulse Innovations demonstrated the innovative spirit so prevalent in Lehigh Valley, and shifted into a brand new direction.

The software integrator company developed a Thermographic Monitoring System, a new product consisting of high-end cameras and software that can scan people and detect fevers from up to 10 feet away as they enter a building or space.

The entry screening and exit walk flow for the Thermographic Monitoring System product. (image courtesy Pulse Innovations)

“This is an added layer of protection that will give people a better sense of security when out in the Lehigh Valley,” said Gabriel Jimenez, Director of Product Development with Pulse Innovations.

This non-invasive, no-contact system provides fast, accurate mass screening for elevated temperatures for up to 20 people simultaneously. It displays the temperatures on a screen and gives an alert if signs of a fever are detected, and keeps a running tally of total normal and alerted subjects.

The product will help prospective customers protect their employees and visitors during the COVID-19 crisis, as well as help protect against a potential second wave, providing an optimal balance between health and economic protection according to the company.

The system also has potential uses that will be helpful even after the pandemic has passed, Jimenez said. Its facial recognition capabilities could be useful as a time-clock solution, or could be used as a means of providing specific people access to secure rooms.

“Future updates will all be software based, allowing hardware to remain the same,” Jimenez said. “Owners will just need to subscribe to apply the updates.”

The Thermographic Monitoring System detects temperature by recognizing and capturing levels of infrared light which, though invisible to the naked eye, can be seen as heat if the intensity is high. Although not technically a medical device, Jimenez said it is more accurate than most thermometers.

Temperatures above the notification threshold are automatically sent to a web application. The system can be set to a private mode, so other people going through the system will not see an individual person’s information.

Jimenez said the system could be used not only at businesses, but also at such places as baseball stadiums or school buildings. Pulse Innovations uses it at their own company building in Wilson.

Pulse Innovations had developed multiple RFID solutions prior to the pandemic. Among them are smart closets and cabinets that could track the individual items within them, as well as a roaming asset project for a doggy daycare that tracked what fenced-in areas each dog was located.

Pulse Innovations is one of several companies that began development of new products in response to the coronavirus pandemic. OraSure Technologies began work on an oral fluid coronavirus self-test, and LifeAire Systems designed a decontamination unit for N95 masks.

Additionally, Sharp Clinical Services supported COVID-19 clinical trials from its Pennsylvania facilities, Polymer Contours developed an elevator hygiene product called PushSafe, and UBMe created a smartphone app for businesses and customers called Curbside Communication.

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